Skip to main content

Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

See other formats


ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



* 



Receipts and Expenditures 



OF THE 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 



r 



TOGETHER WITH THE 



SCHOOL REPORT 



FOR THE 



Year ending Feb. 29, 1892. 



LOWELL, MASS. 




• 

i 

1 


VOX POPULI PRESS, 130 CENTRAL STREET. 

1892. 




»\ 


*w. 


4 





Officers of the Town of Chelmsford, 1891, 



Selectmen, Assessors, and Overseers of the Poor — Eben T. Adams, George 

F. Snow, Martin Robbins, Elisha H. Shaw, Newell E. Parker. 
Town Clerk — George A. Parkhurst. 
Town Treasurer — Edwin H. Warren. 

Auditors — Ziba Gay, Edward F. Richardson, Henry S. Perham. 
School Committee — Three years: J. Adams Bartlett, Orrin Pierce, 

Luther C. Upham; two years: Frank C. Byam, Riley Davis, 

Henry R. Hodson; one year: George A. Byam, Royal S. Ripley, 

John H. Whidden. 
Collector of Taxes — Martin Robbins. 
Superintendent of Streets — Daniel W. Lane. 
Constables — James P. Emerson, John T. McCoy, David A. Polley, John 

H. Whidden, Samuel J. Garland, George F. Dyar. 
Fence Viewers — Albion J. Lamphere, James P. Emerson, Daniel P. 

Byam. 
Appraisers of Personal Property at the Town Farm — James P. Emerson, 

Daniel P. Byam, Charles A. Holt. 
Weighers of Hay — Marcus H. Winship, Eben T. Adams, Elisha H. 

Shaw, James P. Emerson, Daniel W. Bickford, Henry H. Emer- 
son, S. Waldo Parkhurst, Arthur I. Emerson. 
Measurers of Wood — Arthur I. Emerson, S. Waldo Parkhurst, 

Newell E. Parker, Elisha H. Shaw, James P. Emerson, Marcus 

H. Winship. 
Surveyors of Lumber — R. Wilson Dix, Eli P. Parker, Edwin K. Park- 
hurst, George E. Spaulding, E. Lincoln Russell, Stewart 

McKay. 
Field Drivers — George O. Spaulding, Ervin W. Sweetser, Frank E. 

Bickford. 
Sealer of Weights and Measures — True Morton. 
Weighers of Coal — S. W. Parkhurst, Arthur I. Emerson, Marcus H. 

Winship, Daniel W. Bickford, Elisha H. Shaw, Hermon W. 

Flint. 
Fish Warden — John H. Clark. 
Superintendents of Burials — Lewis K. Howard, Daniel P. Byam, Arthur 

H. Sheldon, John H. Whidden. 
Firewards — Stewart McKay, Charles F. Scribner, John Connor, 

Fred E. Nason, Almon W. Holt, Daniel P. Byam, Warren 

Berry, Frank C. Byam. 
Forest Firewards — Amos B. Adams, Warren Berry, Arthur H. Shel- 
don, George F. Snow. 
Registrars of Voters — Nathan B. Edwards, Lew t is M. Dutton, John F. 

McManomin, George A. Parkhurst. 
Precinct Wardens — Eben R. Marshall, Warren Berry (1); Arthur H. 

Sheldon, Charles H. Dutton (2) ; Alfred G. Parkhurst, Eugene 

W. S. Dutton (3). 
Precinct Clerks— Joseph E. Warren (1) ; Fred K. Ripley (2) ; Marcus 

H. Winship (3). ) 

Precinct Inspectors — Albert P. Perham, Almon W. Holt (1) ; George 

Hyde, Hubert Bearce (2); William H. Brow t n, Joseph G. 

Quessy (3). 
Deputy Precinct Inspectors — James S. Byam, Daniel P. Byam (1); 
* « William Quigley, John C. Hobbs (2); Joseph A. ParkhurstA 

John Cunningham (3). . ^^L Nj 

2. . r : 



REPORT OF THE TOWN CLERK 

For the Year ending Feb. 29, 1892. . 



BIRTHS. 

Males 24 

Females 27 

Total 51 

Births of native parentage 22 

Births of foreign parentage 18 

Births of native and foreign parentage 11 

Note. — Births occurring late in the year are sometimes returned 
without the Christian name. In all such cases parents should return 
the name to the Town Clerk as soon as selected, as an incomplete- 
ness of the record may involve much trouble in the future. 

MARRIAGES. 

Whole number 17 

Between natives 10 

Between natives and foreigners 7 

Chelmsford grooms 10 

Chelmsford brides 11 

Solemnized in Chelmsford 9 

DEATHS. 

Date. Names. Yrs. Mos. Days. 

Jan. 9 Ernestine Moison 44 

f 14 Mary S. Johnson 72 5 19 

15 Eugenie S. Paignon 17 7 12 

17 James McQuaid 65 

18 Mary B. Clogston 83 3 5 

♦ 24 William H. Smith 54 



Date. Names. Yrs. Mos. Days. 

Feb. 3 Charles Devine 1 

8 Sarah F. Worthen. 59 

11 Israel L. Putnam 51 

18 Hhoda T. Sampson 69 

Mar. 1 Rosanna MeEneaney 61 

9 Franklin F. Pearl 78 

29 Martha II. Wright 69 

31 Joseph Cummings 

April 6 Lilla A.Rice 24 

17 Sarah Ellen Winn 68 

27. . . :. .George W. Whidden, jr 27 

28 Susan E.Ward 46 

May 1 Bertha F. Stewart 

7 Charles W. Crooker 40 

10 Patrick McNally 66 

15 Carrie B. Penniman 23 

18 Elzina E. Bobbins 59 

20 Willard E. Martindale 1 

30 .... . .Hannah M. Richardson 73 

June 24 Charles W. Flint 62 

28 Bernice C. Whittemore 2 

30 Frank VV. Martin 28 

July 4 Elizabeth Crowley 52 

6 George C. Byam ... 34 

13 Ernest Roberge 

16 James A. Ward 28 

24 Delia Jutres 

27 Goldie Snow Harris 1 

Aug. 3 Son of Stephen and Ellen Ward 

(stillborn). 

4 Rodney Center 82 

5 Stella M. Wright 15 

Sept. 8 Annie L. Vinal 2 

9 Emma S. Melvin 87 5 15 

13 Frank Young 63 

Oct. 13 Mary J. McManomin 25 

23 Relief S. Byam 89 

25 Henry Olsen 2 

25 Susan J. Hegeman 51 

30 Jane Ann Pearson 61 

Nov. 4 LeviChesley 81 

17 Mary Jane Ward 

25 Amos N. Byam 37 

Dec. 7 William Boughton 54 

20 Sarah J. Coffin 33 

21 Charlotte Parker 84 

22 Emeline A. Kennan 72 



5 




11 


13 


10 




5 


18 


11 




8 


5 


7 


19 


3 


3 




26 


10 


10 


11 




5 


17 


6 


6 


7 


16 


5 




11 


20 


3 


18 


1 


3 




22 


2 


11 


4 


2 




28 


7 


27 


9 


20 


4 


5 



7 


19 


1 


25 




24 


1 
9 


11 
23 



DOG LICENSES. 

East Cambridge, Mass. June 3, 1891. 
Received of George A. Parkhurst, Town Clerk of Chelmsford, 
Mass , on account of dog licenses, as per his return of June 2, 1891, 
eighty-three dollars and forty cents. 

$83.40. J. O. Hayden, County Treasurer. 



East Cambridge, Mass., Dec. 11, 1891. 
Received of George A. Parkhurst, Town Clerk of Chelmsford, 
Mass , on account of dog licenses, ;is per his return of Dec. 1, 1891, 
two hundred and seventy-six dollars. 

$276.00. J. O. Hayden, County Treasurer. 



Number of dogs licensed 183 

Males 173 

Females 10 

Amount received for licenses $396 00 

Amount of fees (20 cents per license) 36 60 

Paid to the County Treasurer 359 40 

85J per cent, refunded 311 22 

GEORGE A. PARKHURST, 

Town Clerk. 



REPORT OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

For the Year ending Feb. 29, 1892. 



Your Treasurer charges himself with cash balance in 

treasury, as found at last annual settlement $1,519 77 

Cash received as follows : Of 

State Treasurer, as State Aid for 1890 645 00 

Relief to Indigent Soldiers and 

Sailors Ill 00 

on account of Corporation tax for 1890, 36 41 

on account of Corporation tax for 1891, 1,433 84 
on account of National Bank tax for 

1891 1,095 92 

on account of Armory rent 150 00 

on account of income Massachusetts 

school fund 212 73 

on account of aid to State pauper 94 50 

County Treasurer, on account of dog licenses for 1891. . 311 22 

City of Lowell, on account of aid to paupers 52 39 

City of Somerville, on account of aid to paupers 38 62 

Clerk of Police Court,_Lowell, on account of fines 62 72 

E. T. Adams, on account of error in Police Court bill. . . 4 52 

E. T. Adams, on account of error in grain bill 3 00 

E. T. Adams, on account of cash return for burial of 

pauper 5 00 

Matthias Hutchins, on account of hospital bills 193 14 

Wilber A. Cheney, on account of sale of lot in Centre 

Cemetery <. 20 00 

L. K. Howard, on account of sale of lots in Centre 

Cemetery 16 00 

L. K. Howard, on account of sale of hay from Centre 

Cemetery 24 64 

A. H. Sheldon, on account of sale of lots at North 

Chelmsford Cemetery 25 00 

Amount carried forward $6,055 42 



Amount brought forward $6,055 42 

A. H. Sheldon, on account of sale of hay from North 

Chelmsford Cemetery 3 50 

John H. Wilson (at hand of E. T. Adams), use of 

Centre Town Hall 10 00 

John H. Wilson (at hand of E. T. Adams), for one two- 
horse cart 40 00 

William J. Quigley (at hand of E. T. Adams), use of 

Town Hall at North Chelmsford 15 00 

George F. Snow, on account of sale of school books 

and supplies 51 27 

R. S. Ripley, on account of tuition of non-resident 

pupils 7 20 

J. H. Whidden, on account of tuition of non-resident 

pupils 4 50 

Thomas Plunkett (at hand of E. H. Shaw), for lot old 

floor boards ' 4 00 

Elmer Hildreth (at hand of E. T. Adams), for one horse 

from town team 50 00 

Shepherd Woods (at hand of E. T. Adams), for one old 

horse cart 42 00 

L. K. Howard (at hand of E. T. Adams), for one lot 

gravel 1 00 

J. P. Emerson (at hand of E. T. Adams), lot old shovels, 1 25 

Michael 0' Day (at hand of E. T. Adams), lot old bridge 

plank 1 50 

E. G. Smith (at hand of E. T. Adams), lot old bridge 

plank 1 00 

Horace Holt (at hand of E. T. Adams), for lot of sand. . 2 50 

Cash received on account of taxes as follows : Of 

Martin Bobbins, tax of 1889 in full 140 90 

as interest on same 19 86 

tax of 1890 (on account of) 1,687 76 

on account of interest on same 81 33 

on account of tax of 1891 14,277 81 

on account of interest on same 71 58 

Overseers of Poor (at hand of F. A. Page), as proceeds 

of town farm in March, 1891 27 02 

Overseers of Poor, on account of proceeds of Town 

Farm for 1891 *1,212 54 

Cash hired for use of Town, as temporary loan 4,000 00 

Making a total of $27,808 94 



* This item includes highway board bill and proceeds from sale of horse 
for town team. 



And is credited as follows : 

By cash paid State Tax for 1891 $ 1,260 00 

County Tax for 1891 1,352 52 

For care of Emerson Lot in Centre 

Cemetery 5 00 

For care of Kimball Lot in Centre 

Cemetery 5 00 

Orders drawn for the present financial year, 

ending Feb. 29, 1*92 20,276 36 

Temporary loan in full 4,000 00 

As interest on same 73 33 

Balance in treasury, as found on settlement 836 73 

$27,808 94 



E. H. WARREN, 

Treasurer. 
Chelmsford, March 3, 1892. 



( 



REPORT OF THE ASSESSORS 



For the Year ending Feb. 29, 1892. 



Valuation May 1, 1891. 

Real estate (resident) $1,319,145 00 

Real estate (non-resident) 217,265 00 

Personal estate (resident) $274,085 00 

Personal estate (non-resident) 3,055 00 



$1,536,410 00 



277,140 00 



Total valuation of assessed estate 



$1,813,550 00 



Rate of taxation, $8.50 per $1,000.00. 
Polls $2.00 

Number* of polls 797 

assessed on polls only, 309 

assessed on property. . 834 

Total number assessed 1,143 

Number of horses assessed ... . 514 

cows assessed 1,059 

swine assessed 195 

fowl assessed 9,982 

dwellings asssessed, 646 

acres of land assessed 14,215 

Valuation of buildings .... $809,035 00 

Valuation of land $727,375 00 



10 



Taxes. 

State tax $1,260 00 

County tax 1,352 52 

Appropriation for public schools 5,700 00 

school incidentals... 400 00 

text-books and sup- 
plies 600 00 

school apparatus .... 100 00 

support of poor 2,300 00 

highways 4,000 00 

repairs of public build- 
ings .... 800 00 

indigent soldiers and 

sailors 150 00 

town officers and com- 
mittees 900 00 

collection and abate- 
ment of taxes ... 300 00 

enforcement of liquor 

law 150 00 

care and improvement 

of cemeteries.... 300 00 

bridge at North 

Chelmsford 1,100 00 

well at Centre 150 00 

Memorial Day 50 00 

miscellaneous ex- 
penses 300 00 

improvement, Bridge 

street (Centre) . . 400 00 

$20,312 52 

Overlayings 96 65 

$20,409 17 
Less estimated receipts 3,000 00 

$17,409 17 
Less appropriation from treasury 400 00 

Total tax commmitted $17,009 17 



Tax on 797 polls $ 1,594 00 

Tax on property 15,415 17 

$17,009 17 



11 



MISCELLANEOUS. — CHANGES IN THE STATE THE PAST YEAR. 

The valuation of buildings has increased $42,713,213 00 

land has increased 35,694,492 00 

personal estate has increased 12,499,942 00 

Total increase $90,907,647 00 

Number of horses assessed 181,705 

cows assessed 198,310 

sheep assessed 47,536 

swine assessed ! 40,776 

fowl assessed 644,009 

dwelling houses assessed 361,066 

acres of land assessed 4,498,012 

Increase in number of horses 2.963 

Decrease in number of cows 2,348 

Increase in number of sheep 1,637 

Decrease in number of swine 1,384 

Increase in number of dwelling houses. . . 10,529 

Average rate of tax, $14.50 on $1,000. 

Highest rate, $25.00 on $1,000, in town of Shutesbury, county of 
Franklin. 

Lowest rate, $3.89 on $1,000, in town of Gosnold, county of Dukes. 

There are 28 cities, and 323 towns. 

No cities, and but 18 towns have a less tax rate than Chelmsford. 

GEO. F. SNOW, 
EBEN T. ADAMS, 
MARTIN BOBBINS, 
NEWELL E. PARKER, 
ELISHA H. SHAW, 

Assessors. 



COLLECTORS' REPORTS. 



Collector's Report for 1889. 

Taxes on list of 1889, uncollected Feb. 28, 

1891 $140 90 

Interest on same to Feb. 28, 1891 13 99 

Interest accrued since Feb. 28, 1891 5 87 

$160 76 

Cash paid Town Treasurer, as tax $140 90 

Cash paid Town Treasurer, as interest 19 86 

$160 76 

Collector's Report for 1890. 

Taxes on list of 1890, uncollected Feb. 28, 

1890 $2,306 04 

Interest on same to Feb. 28, 1890 67 26 

Interest accrued since Feb. 28, 1890 75 39 

$2,448 69 

Cash paid Town Treasurer, as tax $1,687 76 

Cash paid Town Treasurer, as interest 81 33 

Uncollected taxes to new account. 618 28 

Uncollected interest to new account 61 32 

$2,448 69 

Collector's Report for 1891. 

Tax list for 1891 $17,009 17 

Anditional taxes 24 68 

Interest collected since Oct. 1, 1891 71 58 

Accrued interest on uncollected taxes 80 38 

$17,185 81 

Cash paid Town Treasurer, as tax $14,277 81 

Cash paid Town Treasurer, as interest 71 58 

Uncollected taxes to new account 2,756 04 

Accrued interest to new account 80 38 

$17,185 81 



MARTIN ROBBINS, Collector. 



REPORT OF THE SELECTMEN 

For the Year ending Feb. 29, 1892. 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

PAID FOR TEACHING. 

No. 1, Susie M. Emerson, 35 weeks 8571 00 

1, Gertrude W. Byam, 36 weeks 324 00 

1, Frances Clark, 12 weeks 108 00 

1, Daisy C. Sawtelle, 12 weeks 108 00 

1, Hattie A. Snell, 24 weeks 216 00 

1, Carrie L. Adams, 24 weeks 216 00 $1,543 00 

2, Ella M. Hutchinson, 12 weeks 96 00 

2, Blanche Bassett, 24 weeks 192 00 288 00 

3, Charlotte M. B. Taylor, 24 weeks .... 216 00 

3, Celia P. Battles, 12 weeks 108 00 324 00 

4, Carrie L. Adams, 12 weeks 1(2 00 

4, Fannie G. Flanders, 24 weeks 204 00 306 00 

5, Amy Marshall, 12 weeks 96 00 

5, Jennie Bartlett, 11§ weeks 92 80 

5, Ida E. Byam, 12 weeks 96 00 284 80 

6, Asjnes M. Bates, 10 weeks 90 00 

6, Helen Hadley, 24 weeks 216 00 306 00 

8, John Q. Hay ward, 36 weeks 756 00 

8, Lucy A. Crawford, 36 weeks 324 00 

8, Angie Campbell, 12 weeks 108 00 

8, Laura G. Hoy t, 36 weeks 324 00 

8, Minnie A. Hyde, 24 weeks 216 00 1,728 00 

9, Imogene Foster, 12 weeks 108 00 

9, Agnes Taylor, 36 weeks 324 00 

9, Ella M. Hutchinson, 24 weeks 216 00 648 00 

$5,427 80 



14 



/ 



CARE AND CLEANING OF SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

No. 1, Joseph Elliott, care $120 00 

1, Mrs. John Kelly, cleaning 9 60 $129 60 

2, Ella M. Hutchinson, care 6 00 

2, Arthur Decatur, care 11 00 

2, Luther C. Uphara, cleaning 2 00 19 00 

3, Nettie Byam, care 4 80 

3, Grace Garland, care 12 00 16 80 

4, Edward Robbins, care 6 00 

4, Edith M. Davis, care 6 00 

4, Frank A. Melvin, care 6 00 

4, E. Richardson, cleaning 1 00 19 00 

5, Bernard H. Byam, care 1890 14 00 

6, Bertha L. Teabo, care 18 00 

8, Chas. E. Hyde, care 108 00 

8, Chas. E. Hyde, cleaning 10 38 118 38 

9, John Dunn, care 20 00 

9, J. H. Whidden, care and cleaning. ... 6 71 

9, John Knowles, care 10 00 36 71 



SCHOOL FUEL. 



/ 



5 


00 


23 


00 


6 


25 


10 


00 


2 


75 


21 


00 


1 


00 


20 


00 


2 


00 


12 


50 


10 


50 



$371 49 



No. 1, Harry L. Parkhurst, 50,160 lbs. coal. . $175 56 $175 56 
2, E. F. Richardson, 3 cords oak and 1 

cord pine wood 19 50 

2, Luther C. Upham, preparing 4 cords 

of wood 5 00 24 50 

3, B. O. Robbins, 4 cords wood 

3, George P. Mansfield, 10 ft. prepared 

wood 

4, J. L. Putnam estate, 2 cords pine 

wood 

4, E. L. Russell, -J- cord kindling wood.. . 
4, John H. Redman, 3 cords wood 

4, John H. Redman, housing same 1 00 34 75 

5, George A. Byam, 3 cords prepared 

wood 

5, Bernard H. Byam, housing wood .... 2 00 22 00 

6, Orrin Pierce, 2 cords prepared wood, 
6, Chas. O. Corliss 12 ft. prepared wood, 
6, P. S. & T. S. Edmands, 8 ft. prepared 

wood 5 00 28 00 



Amount carried forward $314 06 



73 50 




24 00 




6 56 




10 50 




4 50 




13 76 




24 88 


157 70 


20 00 




37 00 




6 00 




3 00 


66 00 



15 



Amount brought forward $314 06 

No. 8, Seth P. Sampson, 14 cords oak wood, 
8, Seth P. Sampson, 6 cords pine wood, 
8, Chelmsford Foundry Co., 2100 lbs. 

coal 

8, Ralph L. Ripley, preparing 20 cords 

wood 

8, Chas. Hyde, housing 18 cords wood, 
8, E. Shaw & Son, 4075 lbs coal 

8, E. Shaw & Son, 56| ft. pine wood. . . 

9, Fred L. Fletcher, 4 cords oak wood, 
9, J. H. Whidden, 8 cords oak wood. . . 
9, Joseph P. Winn, preparing 8 cords 

wood 

9, John Dunn, preparing wood 

$537 76 



SCHOOL INCIDENTALS. 

Geo F. Snow, Superintendent $200 00 $200 00 

Riley Davis, service and expenses as Secre- 
tary of School Board 10 75 10 75 

No. 1, Bartlett & Dow, suppplies 9 95 

1, F. G. Pratt, painting blackboards 14 30 

1, E. R. Marshall, supplies 75 

1, H. H. Wilder, repair of furnace 26 40 51 40 

2, L. C. Upham, expense, table etc 4 50 

2, E. R. Marshall, table 1 50 

2, H. Holt, setting glass 1 25 7 25 

3, D. W. Bickford, supplies 1 62 1 62 

5, E. R. Marshall, table 4 00 

5, Geo. A. Byam, supplies 1 43 5 43 

6, Orrin Pierce, supplies 6 85 6 85 

8, E. A. Wright, repairing clocks 3 00 

8, F. A. Derby, supplies 7 20 

8, Chas. Hyde, supplies 3 36 

8, E. Shaw & Son 8 79 

8, Geo. H. Smith, labor and supplies .... 20 25 

8, C. B. Coburn, oil, etc 3 20 

,^/- 8, Storage Battery Co., supplies 6 58 52 38 

9, H. R. Hodson, supplies 1 68 

Gf 9, J. H. Whidden, supplies 35 2 03 

$337 71 



16 



SCHOOL TEXT BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 



Boston School Supply Co., books and sup- 
plies .... 

William M. Sargent, supplies 

Ginn & Co., books 

Thompson, Brown & Co., books and sup- 
plies 

D. C. Heath & Co., books 

Geo. F. King & Merrill, supplies 

University Publishing Co., books 

Prang Educational Co., supplies 

Vox Populi Press., supplies 

J. Merrill & Son, supplies 

Harry Raynes, clock, 

American Book Co., books 

Educational Publishing Co., books 

J. L. Hammett, supplies 

Geo. S. Perry, supplies 

Warren P. Adams, books 

Silver, Burdett & Co., books 

H. C. Church & Son, supplies 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co., books 

Lowell Rubber Co., stamp 

Bartlett & Dow, thermometers 

New England Publishing Co., books 

Lee & Shepard, books 

Bacheller, Dumas & Co., rebinding books 

Porter & Coates, books 

American Express Co., express on books and 
supplies 

Geo. F. Snow, services and expense buying 
and delivering books and supplies 



$ 56 60 


42 


52 


52 


01 


30 


12 


3 


47 


18 


50 


5 


25 


10 


05 


7 


75 


1 


00 


1 


50 


117 


90 


5 


76 


82 


11 


50 


15 


5 


54 


19 


»7 


7 


00 


7 


75 


1 


25 


1 


50 


4 


70 


5 


93 


3 


00 


44 


04 


13 


97 


50 


00 



$648 74 



SCHOOL APPARATUS. 



Prang Educational Co., models and sup- 
plies 

Silver, Burdett & Co., maps 

C. B. Coburn, waste baskets 

J. L. Hammett, pads 

American Express Co 



$75 


94 


8 


90 


4 


00 


7 


20 


1 


20 



$97 i \ 



17 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 



EXPENSES OUTSIDE OF ALMSHOUSE. 



Worcester Insane Asylum, in aM of Daniel 

Gilligan $169 46 

Worcester Lunatic Hospital, in aid of Ella 

Hutchins 169 46 

Northampton Lunatic Hospital, in aid of 

Lura E. Bailey.... 169 46 

Danvers Lunatic Hospital, in aid of Catherine 

McMahon 181 75 

St. John's Hospital, in aid of Thomas Law- 

ler 104 27 

City of Boston, in aid of Asenath Clapp 40 00 

City of Lowell, in aid of Fred E. Russell and 

family 3 50 

City of Lowell, in aid of Kate Ward and 

children 9 00 

City of Lowell, in aid of Michael Holland and 

wife 9 00 

J. B. Currier, casket for Thomas Trainor. . . 12 00 

L. K. Howard, services as undertaker, 

Thomas Trainor 4 00 

Dr. E. H. Chamberlain, aid to Thomas 

Trainor 1 50 

E. Shaw <fc Son, in aid of Mrs. James Mc- 

Ennis 36 00 

E. Shaw & Son, in aid of tramps 1 20 

E. Shaw & Son, in aid of James Boynton. . . 43 62 
Worcester Lunatic Hospital, in aid of Har- 
riet E. Hutchins 23 68 

Dr. Amasa Howard, in aid to Mrs. McEnnis, 8 75 

Dr. Amasa Howard, in aid to Livingston 

family 3 00 

Solomon Spaulding:, in aid to S. D. Dutton, 34 00 

J. S. Wotton, in aid to tramps 6 00 

J. F. O'Donnell, removing and burying body 

found in Merrimack river 15 00 

J. F. O'Donnell, hack for Mrs. Crowley 3 00 

Mxs. A. H. Spaulding, in aid to Mrs. Mc- - 

Ennis 11 00 

George F. Snow, in aid to poor 3 50 



169 


46 


169 


46 


169 


46 


181 


75 


104 


27 


40 


00 



21 50 

17 50 

80 82 
23 68 



11 75 

34 00 

6 00 



18 00 

11 00 
3 50 



$1,062 15 



18 



EXPENSES AT ALMSHOUSE. 

S. H. Nason, 11 months' services as superin- 
tendent $320 00 

S. H. Nason, cash items, as per cash book. . . 26 13 

F. A. Page, superintendent for March 33 34 

Wm. M. Sargent, day book for farm 75 

E. E. Dutton, 60 feet chestnut joist 1 20 

E. W. Svveetser, meat and provisions. 212 10 

C. A. Frost, meat and provisions 80 50 

Fred S. Brown, meat and provisions 19 65 

Dutton Bros., grain 355 39 

Dutton Bros., ice 25 49 

Dutton Bros., sawing 1 45 

S. W. Parkhurst, groceries 428 16 

S. W. Parkhurst, stamps 50 

F. F. Severance, bread and crackers 18 40 

H. M. Hutching, one horse 75 00 

Lillian S. Kowell, labor 13 26 

Frank Williams, labor 9 00 

W. H. S. Clogston, labor 21 00 

Joseph O'Day, labor 77 30 

James Mahoney, labor 50 

Geo. W. White, labor 16.34 

Minot Lovering, labor 2 10 

Thomas O'Brien, labor 20 75 

F. A. Blackmer, labor 2 60 

Charles E. Parkhurst, labor 5 65 

Joseph Teabo, labor 10 50 

Mrs. Kelley, labor 90 

Joseph Berard & Son, labor 32 87 

Joseph White, labor . . 2 00 

Florence Furbush, labor 135 00 

T. Costello & Co., labor on pipe 2 00 

Caleb L. Smith, groceries 49 30 

P. M. Jefferson, soap 22 40 

J. S. Shedd, 2 axe handles 45 

G. R. Fletcher, measuring hay 50 

W. A. Mack & Co., 14 lbs. of pipe 1 68 

Ingham & Bradbury, butter 9 00 

H. Richardson, repairing chairs and table. . . 85 

Harry L. Parkhurst, 12 tons coal 84 00 

Town of Chelmsford, taxes 61 07 

D. S. Perham, difference in cows 40 00 

E. L. Russell, pasturing cows 10 00 

B. M. Hildreth, driving cows 25 

Amount carried forward 



$346 13 

33 34 

75 

1 20 



312 25 



382 33 

428 66 
18 40 
75 00 



351 77 
49 30 

22 40 


2 63 

9 00 

85 

84 00 

61 07 


50 23 



$2,229 33 



19 



Amount brought forward $2,229 33 

A. B. Adams, driving cows 

A. B. Adams, posts and plank 

Carl A. Sylvander, boots and shoes 

J. W. Higgins, board of pauper 

N. J. Wier & Co., one range 

A. G. Pollard & Co., dry goods 

Moir Bros. & Co., dry goods 

F. G. Mitchell & Co., dry goods and crockery, 

J. V. Keyes & Co., dry goods 

O'Donnell & Gilbride, dry goods 

Dr. Amasa Howard, medical attendance .... 
Dr. E. H. Chamberlain, medical attendance. . 

Bartlett & Dow, supplies 

Benner & Corey, oil cloth 

H. C. McOsker, 9 shades 

H. C. McOsker, 8 shades 

Mrs. N. L. Wheeler, pattern 

E C. Perham, cherries 

D L. Sherman, keys 

U. S. Tea Co , clothes line 

F. G. Pratt, varnishing wagon 

H. F. Ebert, supplies 

George M. Wright, blacksmithing 

William H. Ward, blacksmithing 

Mis. Richardson, berries 

William R. Fowle, corned beef 

Mr. O'Day, vegetables 

John Keats, setting posts 

John Keats, butchering 

J. L. Chalifoux, clothing 

Public Market Packing Co., meat 

N. J. Wier & Co., tinware 

A. L. Butnam, repairing harness 

II. H. Wilder & Co., stove lining 

Isaac Hicks, pump handle 

Norris Bros., 3 pork barrels 

A. Kimball, tobacco 

W. Gordon, 4 loads cotton waste 

Mrs. A. P. Stevens, apples 

Mrs. J. Burdett, apples 

Jacob Spaulding, apples 

A. C. Skinner, hosiery 

. C. Glidden, shoes 

Wm. McLarney, kettle and spider 

Amount carried forward 



\ 2 00 




8 62 


10 62 


2 75 




1 00 




45 25 




2 88 




1 78 




7 47 




1 87 




1 08 


64 08 


27 70 


27 70 


5 50 


5 50 


33 82 


33 82 


50 




2 70 




2 40 




30 




50 




20 




15 




6 00 




7 10 


19 85 


9 65 




90 


10 55 


1 60 




5 57 




85 




1 40 




3 75 




6 00 




90 




4 05 




1 00 




75 




50 




2 25 




45 


29 07 


5 00 


5 00 


2 00 




6 00 




5 50 


13 50 


50 




1 50 




1 35 


3 35 




$2,452 37 



20 



Amount brought forward 

French & Puffer, lamp 

H. B. Shattuck, cultivator teeth 

Mrs. J. B. Kimball, standing grass 

Mrs. J. B. Kimball, vinegar 

Judson F. Sweetser, beef 

Wm. S. Pierce, filing saws 

Lamson & Pinder, supplies 

J. M. Joy, tobacco 

Chas Coleman, sawing wood 

Marrinell & Co., stone post 

David Gerow, supplies 

Wm. H. Hills, liniment 

Arthur M. Warren, vegetables 

John Higgins, 2 bushel onions 

Mrs. Lovering, eggs 

E. F. Richardson, cider 

E. F. Richardson, spring for mowing machine, 

C. A. Robinson, fish 

L. K. Howard, hay 

E. T. Adams, services and expenses as over- 
seer 

Martin Robbins, services and expenses as 
overseer 

Elisha H. Shaw, services and expenses as 
overseer 

George F. Snow, services and expenses as 
overseer 

Proceeds of Town Farm 

Total expense of poor at Almshouse. . . . 



$2,452 37 



75 




2 25 


3 00 


18 00 




4 42 


22 42 


5 20 


5 20 


1 05 


1 05 


2 32 


2 32 


3 00 


3 00 


5 00 


5 00 


1 50 


1 50 


44 


44 


35 


35 


1 00 




2 00 




75 




32 




40 


4 47 


20 29 


20 29 


24 64 


24 64 


20 50 




22 00 




7 62 




15 00 


65 12 




$2,611 17 




1,212 54 



$1,398 63 



Paid for outside poor 

Received on account of outside poor: 

From City of Lowell, on account of aid to 
paupers 

From State Treasurer, on account of State 
paupers 

From Mathias Hutchins, on account of hos- 
pital bills 

Expense of outside poor 

Expense of poor at Almshouse 

Total 



$1,062 15 




$ 678 50 
1,398 63 

$2,077 13 



21 



Inmates, 7 ; males, 3 ; females, 4 ; tramps, 477. 

Martin Robbins, 
Geo. P. Snow, 
Eben T. Adams, 
Newell E. Parker, 
Elisha H. Shaw, 



Overseers. 



APPRRAISAL OF PERSONAL PROPERTY AT ALMS- 
HOUSE, MARCH 1, 1892 

8 cows $238 00 

1 farm horse 150 00 

50 fowls 25 00 

3 harnesses 25 00 

2 robes and blankets 18 00 

1 Democrat wagon 40 00 

Stable tools 4 25 

1 set double harnesses 12 00 

Seed corn 4 75 

Small tools 24 95 

1 hay cutter 5 50 

Grain and scraps 4 25 

3 ladders 5 75 

13 cords manure 65 00 

7 shotes 41 00 

1 horse cart 20 00 

5 tons meadow hay 37 50 

9 tons English hay 162 00 

Oat fodder 9 00 

Wheelbarrow and grindstone 6 50 

Mowing machine f 35 00 

2 harrows, 4 plows 24 00 

Farm wagon 50 00 

Night box and hay rack 6 00 

Lot lumber 15 00 

2 pig boxes 1 50 

7 scythes and snaths 3 50 

1 horse rake 10 00 

1 horse hoe 3 50 

1 pung 3 00 

1 square wagon 30 00 

Household furniture and bedding 256 64 

^Provisions and supplies 325 30 

$1,661 89 

J. P. Emerson, ) 

D. P. By am, > Appraisers. 

Chas. A. Holt, ) 



22 



HIGHWAYS. 

George H. Wilson, hay $ 40 39 

Dutton Bros., grain . , 234 13 

J. E. Warren, hay 53 70 

E. Shaw & Son, hay and grain 46 61 

William Fletcher, hay 43 76 

D. C. Perham, hay 74 69 

Mrs. L. B. Emniott, hay 32 36 

D. M. Bickford, grain 27 44 $553 08 

S. W. Parkhurst, supplies 41 81 41 81 

E. Shaw & Son, breaking sidewalks 4 96 

John McKenedy, breaking roads 2 00 

H. R. Hodson, breaking roads 15 38 

Thomas Sheehan, breaking roads 1 50 

Charles Finnick, breaking roads 2 55 

E. E. Dutton, breaking roads . . . : 4 80 

Fred Fletcher, breaking roads 7 80 

J. H. Hazen, breaking roads 4 50 

George E. Spaulding, breaking roads 8 25 

George P. Mansfield, breaking roads, 1890-91, 14 00 

E. L. Russell, breaking roads 3 00 

Warren Berry, breaking roads 4 95 

Samuel Blood, breaking roads 3 00 

Luther Blodgett, breaking sidewalks 3 00 

James P. Emerson, breaking sidewalks 10 50 

George F. Snow, labor and expense on roads, 4 00 

William Redmond, labor on roads 15 50 

R. W. Dix, labor on roads 26 00 135 69 

E. E. Dutton, chestnut posts 5 30 

S. P. Perham, chestnut posts 5 50 

A. L. Brooks & Co., lumber * 74 16 

Davis & Sargent, lumber 28 43 113 39 

H. E Fletcher & Co., covering stone 30 94 

Marinel & Co., edgestone 30 00 60 94 

H. H. Hanson, blacksmithing 70 

F. J. Whittemore, blacksmithing 100 40 

T. Durant & Son, blacksmithing 12 55 

C. Fisher, blacksmithing 32 90 

George W. Wright, blacksmithing 22 19 168 74 

Staples Bros., pipe and cement 10 50 10 50 

F. G. Pratt, painting guideboards 3 90 

N. E. Parker, stock and labor on guideboards, 3 25 7 15 

H. F. Ebert, collars, halters, and straps 13 55 

Fay Bros. &. Hosford, horse blanket 3 25 

S. E. Allen, scraper, edge, and bolts 8 50 

H. L. Parkhurst, express 50 25 80 

Amount carried forward $1,117 10 



219 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 


39 


99 


3 


50 



23 



Amount brought forward $1,117 10 

S. H. Nason, horse and collar 8219 00 

John Byam, stringers for bridge 3 00 

W. N. Hicks, labor on cart 1 00 

J. C. Butterfield, labor and material on fence, 

West Chelmsford 39 99 

F. C. Byam, drag and chain 3 50 

R. B. Hillman, rent, stable, North Chelms- 
ford, 1890 8 00 8 00 

John Marinel, Jr., stone chips and labor. ... 25 60 

J. A. Bartlett, 200 loads gravel 10 00 

F. M. Blodgett, 160 loads gravel 12 80 

Atwood & Pierce, 450 loads gravel 22 50 

Marinel & Co., 60 loads chips 6 00 

Solomon Spaulding, 29 loads gravel 2 90 

J. G. Quessey, 150 loads gravel 10 00 

J. P. Emerson, 484 loads gravel 24 20 

S. S. Sleeper, 200 loads gravel 20 00 

E. F. Richardson, 125 loads gravel 6 25 140 25 

D. W. Lane, board of road-men 535 97 535 97 

Highway pay roll, March 1891 120 28 

April, 1891 175 00 

May, 1891 188 86 

June, 1891 138 50 

July, 1891 170 90 

August, 1891 183 50 

September, 1891 170 50 

October, 1891 153 06 

November, 1891 163 37 

December, 1891 171 50 

January, 1892 157 00 

February, 1892 149 44 1,944 91 



$4,012 72 

Highway pay roll includes salary paid highway surveyor, at $2.00 
per day. 

APPRAISAL OF HIGHWAY TEAMS AND TOOLS 
MARCH 1, 1892. 

4 horses $700 00 

2 sets double harness 100 00 

1 two-horse cart 150 00 

1 two-horse cart 175 00 

1 Champion scraper 150 00 

2 two-horse sleds 80 00 

Amount carried forward $1,355 00 



24 



Amount brought forward $1,355 00 

1 jigger 30 00 

1 two-horse wagon 40 00 

Stone tools 19 50 

4 horse blankets ... 9 00 

1 Chicago scraper 12 00 

1 scoop scraper 4 00 

2 large plows 15 00 

Grain and chest 10 00 

3 tons English hay 54 00 

1 ton meadow hay 7 50 

Post and plank 12 00 

Lead reins, halters, and feed bags 5 50 

Bush hooks, axes, and bush scythes 3 13 

Chains, spikes, and powder 12 15 

Tools and supplies 34 50 



$1,623 28 



J. P. Emerson, 
D. P. Byam, 
Chas. A. Holt, 

Appraisers. 



REPAIRS OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

E. T. Adams, labor and expense, Centre Hall, $ 2 00 

Spaulding & Co., glass, Centre Hall 1 00 

Frederick Taylor, locks, Centre Hall 1 70 

Charles E. Parkhurst, labor, Centre Hall 75 

F. G. Pratt, labor, Centre Hall 25 

F. G.'Pratt, painting hall, Centre Hall 150 00 

Bartlett & Dow, vault lock. Centre Hall 5 00 

A. W. Holt, labor, Centre Hall 75 $161 45 

F. G. Pratt, repairs School house No. 1 43 50 

A. W. Holt, repairs School house No. 1 13 15 56 65 

W. R. Fowle, labor* and supplies, School- 
house No. 2 1 10 110 

N. E. Parker, labor and supplies, School- 
house No. 3 20 00 

C. B. Coburn, supplies, School-house No. 3. . 11 45 31 45 
Orrin Pierce, labor and supplies, School- 
house No. 6 14 75 

A. P. Bateman, supplies, School-house No. 6, 13 15 27 90-—-" 

Wm. C. Edwards, repairs, School-house No. 8, 191 68 

J. L. Hammett, seats, School-house No. 8. . . 95 84 287 52 



Amount carried forward $566 07 



25 



Amount brought forward $566 07 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight on seats, 

School-house No. 8 $16 16 16 16 

John Knowles et al, repairs, School-house 

No. 9 3 82 3 82 

Patrick Doyle, labor and supplies, Flail, North 

Chelmsford 3 50 

Wm. J. Quigley, labor and supplies, Hall, 

North Chelmsford 5 24 8 74 

D. W. Robbins, labor and supplies, Centre 

Hall 4 00 4 00 

$598 79 

CARE AND IMPROVEMENT OF CEMETERIES. 

A. H. Sheldon, labor in Cemetery, North 

Chelmsford $13 97 $13 97 

D. P. By am, labor in Cemetery, South 

Chelmsford 7 30 7 30 

Geo. F. Snow, labor and expense, West 

Chelmsford 3 50 

Geo. W. Buzzy, labor and expense, West 

Chelmsford 5 25 8 75 

L. K. Howard, labor in Cemetery, Chelms- 
ford 9 00 9 00 

Wm. C. Edwards, labor and supplies, North 

Chelmsford 19 61 19 61 

C. H. Dutton, drawing plan, and setting stone 

bounds Cemetery at North Chelmsford. . 42 00 

C. H. Dutton, paid for labor, Cemetery at 

North Chelmsford 17 13 

C. H. Dutton, 592 granite posts, Cemetery at 

North Chelmsford 47 36 106 49 

F. A. Page, labor, Centre Cemetery 9 00 

Nels Nelson, labor, Centre Cemetery 10 00 

William Greenwood, clipping hedge 6 00 25 00 

$190 12 

ENFORCEMENT OF LIQUOR LAW. 

Trull & Wier, attorney fees $ 55 00 $ 55 00 

Simon B. Harris, search warrant ... 12 82 12 82 

-John T. McCoy, service and expense 109 02 

John T. McCoy, expense obtaining evidence, 49 55 158 57 

Due town from fines in Police Court in liquor $226 39 

cases $150 00 



26 



COLLECTION AND ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

Martin Robbins, collecting 1889 taxes, $150.76 

at .011 $ 1 66 

Martin Robbins, collecting 1890 tax, $1,769.11, 

at .01 17 69 

Martin Robbins, collecting 1891 tax, $14,349.- 

39, at .015 215 24 

Martin Robbins, abatement for 1890 148 60 

$383 19 

STATE AID. 

Paid under Chapter 301, Statutes of 1889. . . $635 00 

Paid under Chapter 279, Statutes of 1889. . . 265 00 

$900 00 

MEMORIAL DAY. 

J. P. Emerson, dinner supplies $10 89 

J. P. Emerson, flags 70 $11 59 

S. W. Parkhurst, supplies 4 40 4 40 

J. R. Parkhurst, bouquets for West Chelms- 
ford 1 50 1 50 

R. S. Ripley, barges 9 00 

R. S. Ripley, standards and flags for North 

Chelmsford 4 35 13 35 

A. J. Lamphere, services 5 00 5 00 

$35 84 
WELL AT CENTRE. 

John Higgins, digging well $81 00 

H. E. Fletcher & Co., well stone 12 00 

M. C. Wilson, use of force pump 3 00 

George H. Holt, 1 pump 16 00 

George H. Holt, labor, with man, on well and 

platform 5 25 

A. B. Adams, plank , 1 44 

Chelmsford Foundry Co., iron cover 2 50 

E. R. Marshall, pattern for cover 50 

H. S. Perham, use of tub 25 

S. P. Perham, services as committee 7 00 

J. E. Warren, services as committee 3 00 

$131 or 

BRIDGE AT NORTH CHELMSFORD 

George C. Moore, claim allowed on bridge. . $1,094 00 



27 



IMPROVEMENT OF BRIDGE STREET. 

Alfred Day, services and labor with team. . . $ 19 50 

L. K. Howard, labor, 8£ days 12 75 

John Higgins, labor, 11 days 19 25 

Joseph Sullivan, labor, 11 days 16 50 

E. D. Nickles, labor, 1 day with team 4 00 

George M. Wright, sharpening drills 1 00 

E. E. Dutton, labor with team 1 75 

S. W. Parkhurst, supplies 6 45 

F. J. Whittemore, sharpening drill 1 65 

H. H. Hanson, sharpening drill 1 00 

Willard Stone, labor, 10 days 15 00 

T. J. McDuffee, labor 200 00 

C. H. Hanson & Co., labor 89 15 

E. H. Warren, services 3 00 



TOWN OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES. 



$390 10 



Edwin H. Warren, services as treasurer $75 00 

Edwin H. Warren, expenses as treasurer. ... 6 00 

Edwin H. Warren, services as bridge com- 
mittee, 1890 5 00 $86 00 

George A. Parkhurst, services and expenses 

as Town Clerk 57 17 

George A. Parkhurst, services and expenses 

as registrar 14 50 

Lewis M. Dutton, services as registrar 19 50 

John F. McManomine, services as registrar. . 7 50 

Jos. E. Warren, services as clerk, Precinct 1, 4 50 

E. R.Marshall, services as warden, Precinct 1, 4 50 

Warren Berry, services as warden, Precinct 1, 4 50 

Dan'l P. Byam, services as inspector, Precinct 1, 3 00 

Almon W. Holt, services as inspector, Pre- 
cinct 1 4 50 

Albert P. Perham, services as inspector, Pre- 
cinct 1 4 50 25 50 

Fred'k K. Ripley, services as clerk, Precinct 2, 4 50 

Arthur H. Sheldon, services as warden, Pre- 
cinct 2 4 50 

Charles H. Dutton, services as warden, Pre- 
cinct 2 4 50 

John C. Hobbs, services as deputy inspector, 

B Precinct 2 3 00 

Hubert Bearce, services as inspector, Pre- 
cinct 2 4 50 

William J. Quigley, services as deputy in- 
spector, Precinct 2 3 00 24 00 

Amount carried forward $234 17 



28 

Amount brought forward $234 17 

George Hyde, services as inspector, Pre- 
cinct 2 3 00 

Charles F. Scribner, services as inspector Pre- 
cinct 2 3 00 6 00 

Marcus H. Winship, services as clerk Pre- 
cinct 3 3 00 

Alfred G. Parkhurst, services as warden, Pre- 
cinct 3 3 00 

Eugene M. S. Dutton, services as warden, 

Precinct 3 3 00 

William H. Brown, services as inspector, 

Precinct 3 , 3 00 

Joseph G. Quessy, services as inspector, Pre- 
cinct 3 3 00 

Samuel Naylor, services as deputy inspector, 

Precinct 3 1 50 

Edwin F. Coburn, services as deputy inspect- 
or, Precinct 3 1 50 

Charles Dane, services as deputy inspector, 

Precinct 3 1 50 19 50 

David A. Polley, services as constable 

David A. Polley, services as truant officer. . . 

John T. McCoy, services as constable 

James P. Emerson, services as constable. . . . 

James P Emerson, services as appraiser. . . . 

John H. Whidden, services as constable.... 

Daniel P. Byam, services as appraiser 

Charles A. Molt, services as appraiser 

Alrnon W. Holt, services as fire ward 

Arthur H. Sheldon, services as fireward 

Warren Berry, services as fireward 

Eben T. Adams, services as selectman 

Eben T. Adams, expenses as selectman 

George F. Snow, services as selectman 

George F. Snow, expenses as selectman 

Martin Robbins, services as selectman 

Martin Robbins, expenses as selectman 

Elisha H. Shaw, services as selectman 

Elisha H. Shaw, expenses as selectman 

Newell E. Parker, services as selectman 

Newell. E. Parker, expenses as selectman. . . 

George F. Snow, services as assessor .... ... 

George F. Snow expenses as assessor 

Eben T. Adams, services as assessor 

Eben T. Adams, expenses as assessor 

Martin Robbins, services as assessor 

Martin Robbins, expenses as assessor 

Amount carried forward $819 43 



25 25 




11 00 


36 25 


3 00 


3 00 


55 60 




3 00 


58 60 


13 00 


13 00 


3 00 




3 00 


6 00 


2 00 




2 25 




3 00 


7 25 


75 00 




16 00 


91 00 


45 00 




15 00 


60 00 


33 50 




6 00 


39 50 


43 50 




11 16 


54 66 


46 00 




6 50 


52 50 


72 00 




13 00 


85 0£ 


41 50 




8 00 


49 50 


51 00 




2 50 


53 50 



29 

Amount brought forward $869 43 

Newell E. Parker, services as assessor 

Newell E. Parker, expenses as assessor 

Newell E. Parker, services as registrar 

Elisha H. Shaw services as assessor 

Elisha H. Shaw, expenses as assessor 

Edward F. Richardson, services as auditor. . . 
Henry S. Perhara, services as auditor 



31 50 




5 00 




3 75 


40 25 


24 75 




3 50 


28 25 


3 00 




3 00 


6 00 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE. 



$943 93 



Vox Populi Press, printing town reports.... $71 04 

Vox Populi Press, 1 order book 5 75 

Vox Populi Press, supplies 1 00 $77 79 

Wm. M. Sargent, invoice books and supplies, 6 00 6 00 

Oliver Fiske, use of rifle range 1890-1891 ... 5 00 5 00 
Geo. E. Spaulding, care of Town Hall, North 

Chelu sford 4 50 4 50 

Wm. J. Quigley, care of Town Hall, North 

Chelmsford 34 00 

George F. Stiles 19 34 

Jesse A. Viles, examining horse, case of glan- 
ders 3 00 

A. N. Kidder, varnishing hearse 12 00 

W. A. Josselyn, painting hearse 17 00 

S. W. Huse & Co., election warrants, etc.. . . 8 00 
George A. Parkhurst, record book and blanks, 6 33 
A. J. Lamphere, care of hall, town meetings, 7 89 
Geo. H. Holt, repairs on pump at Centre. ... 3 50 
Geo. W. Wright, repairs on pump at Centre, 2 00 
E. T. Adams, repairs on pump at Centre .... 1 00 
Frank St. Armour, repairs on pump at Centre, 1 00 
E. L. Russell, wood for selectmen's room. ... 4 87 
W. H. Spalding & Co., curtains for select- 
men's room 3 80 3 80 

French & Puffer, lamps, Town Hall, North 

Chelmsford 30 00 

French & Puffer, lamp chimneys and globes, 

Centre 10 38 

S. W. Parkhurst, zinc 35 

L. K. Howard, reporting 17 deaths 4 25 

A. H. Sheldon, reporting 11 deaths 2 75 

1). P. Bynm, reporting 5 deaths 1 25 

"tk^H. Wilson, care of hall and selectmen's 

room 4 50 

Simon B. Harris, service in case of Common- 
wealth 3 88 

$274 38 



34 00 


19 


34 


3 


00 


12 


00 


17 


00 


8 


00 


6 


33 


7 


89 


3 


50 


2 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


4 


87 



40 


38 
35 


8 


25 


4 


50 


3 


88 



AGGREGATE OF APPROPRIATIONS, RECEIPTS, AND 
EXPENDITURES. 



ACCOUNTS. 



Appropria- 
tions. 



Expendi- 
tures. 



Surplus. 



Schools, apppropriations 

School fund 

Dox tax 

Tuition, non-resident pu- 
pils 

Teaching 

Care of houses 

Fuel 

Apparatus 

School incidentals 

Free text-books, appropriation — 

Receipts 

Support of poor, appropriation... 

Receipts 

Highway, appropriation 

Receipts 

State aid, receipts 

Repairs of public buildings, ap- 
propriation 

Relief of indigent soldiers and 

sailors, appropriation 

Relief of indigent soldiers and 

sailors, receipts 

Town officers and committees, 

appropriation 

Collection and abatement of taxes. 
Miscellaneous expenses, appro- 
priation 

Miscellaneous expenses, receipts.. 

Enforcement of liquor law 

Enforcement of liquor law, re- 
ceipts 

Care and improvement of ceme- 
teries 

Bridge at North Chelmsford 

Well at Centre 

Memorial day 

Bridge street appropriation 



S5,700 00 
212 73 
311 22 

11 70 



100 00 

400 00 

600 00 

51 27 

2,300 00 

1,625 71 

4,000 00 

135 75 

645 00 

800 00 

150 00 

111 00 

900 00 
300 00 

300 00 
276 66 
150 00 

62 72 

300 00 

1,100 00 

150 00 

50 00 

400 00 



$5,427 80 

371 49 

537 76 

97 24 

337 71 

648 74 

3,673 32 

4,012 72 
635 00 

598 79 



265 00 

943 93 
383 19 



274 38 



226 39 

190 12 

1,094 00 

131 94 

35 84 

391 00 



$21,143 76 



$20,276 36 
867 40 



$21,143 76 



$21,143 76 



I 2 76 
62 29 

2 53 

252 39 

123 03 
10 00 

201 21 



302 28 



109 88 

6 00 

18 06 

14 16 

9 00 



$1,113 59 



$1,113 59 



$1,113 59 



Appropriations 
Receipts 



$17,700 00 
3,443 76 

$21,143 76 



Amount of orders $20,276 36 

Surplus 867 40 



si>1.U3 Jo'" 



EBEN T. ADAMS, 
ELISHA H. SHAW, 
NEWELL E. PARKER, 
MARTIN ROBBINS, 
GEORGE F. SNOW, 



- Selectmen. 



AUDITORS' REPORT. 




We have examined the accounts of the Treasurer for the year end- 
ing Feb. 29. 1892, and fiud his receipts and payments properly en- 
tered and vouched for, and a balance of eight hundred and thirty- 
six dollars and seventy-three cents ($836.73) in his hands. 

We have also examined the vouchers in the hands of the Select- 
men, and find receipts amounting to twenty thousand two hundred 
and seventy-six dollars and thirty-six cents ($20,276.36), vouching 
for orders drawn on the Treasurer, which have all been paid by him. 

We find: 

Cash in treasury $ 836 73 

Taxes of 1890, uncollected $ 618 28 

Accrued interest on same 61 32 

Taxes of 1891, uncollected 2,756 04 

Accrued interest on same 80 38 3,516 02 

School books, etc., on hand 152 20 

Due from the State : 

State aid to January, 1892 $515 00 

State aid for January and Feburary 120 00 

Relief to January, 1892 243 00 

Relief for January and February 22 00 

Armory rent 150 00 1,050 00 

$5,554 95 
Due from Police Court 165 00 

$5,719 95 

Kimball fund and interest 123 77 

Silver fund and interest 134 15 

Adams Emerson fund and interest 207 50 

Estimated liabilities 100 00 

Abatements estimated 150 00 715 42 

Balance of assets $5,004 53 

E. F. RICHARDSON, 
HENRY S. PERHAM, 

Auditors. 
Chelmsford, March 3, 1892. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 



Middlesex, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Chelmsford, in said 
County, GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are hereby re- 
quired to notify the legal voters of said Chelmsford to meet at the 
Town Hall, at Chelmsford Centre, on Monday, the twenty-first day 
of March current, being the third Monday in said month, at nine 
o'clock in the forenoon, then and there to act on the following 
articles, viz.: 



Article 1. To choose a Moderator. 

Article 2. To hear reports of town officers and committees, and act 

thereon. 
Article 3. To determine the manner of collecting the taxes. 
Article 4. To determine the manner of repairing the highways, townways, 

and bridges. 
Article 5. To choose all necessary town officers. 

Article 6. To act in relation to the list of jurors prepared by the Select- 
men. 
Article 7. To raise and appropriate such sums of money as may be 

required to defray town charges for the ensuing year. 
Article 8. To see if the town will authorize the Treasurer to borrow such 
sums of money as may be required for the demands upon him, 
in anticipation of the taxes of the ensuing year, and payable 
therefrom. 
Article 9. To see if the town will vote to grant licenses for the sale of 

intoxicating liquors for the current year. 
Article 10. To see if the town will authorize the Selectmen to act as its 
agent in any suit or suits which may arise during the ensu- 
ing year. 
Article 11. At the request of E. L. Russell, J. H. Hazen, J. E. Warren/ 
and others, to see if the town will vote to discontinue the 
road leading from the Billerica road, from the residence of 
E. L. Russell to the Boston road, near the residence of 
Samson Stevens; the same being known as the "Causeway 
road." 



33 



Article 12. To see if the town will vote to accept the gift of one hundred 
dollars, in trust, from Harlan P. Goodale and R. Wilson 
Dix, as executors under the will of Bradley Marshall, the 
income to be expended in care of the Thomas Marshall lot 
in Chelmsford Centre Cemetery. 

Article 13. At the request of Henry S. Perhara, to see if the town will 
vote to have the ancient Town Records transcribed, appro- 
priate money for the same, or act in relation thereto. 

Article 14. At the request of E. H. Warren, E K. Parkhurst, C. E A. 
Bartlett, and others, to see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of thirty dollars, for the purpose of 
defraying the expense of running the village clock at the 
centre of the town, or act in relation thereto. 

Article 15. At the request of Andrew M. Blaisdell, Thomas Sheehan, 
William L. Gordon, and others, lo sec if the town will vote 
to dig a well, put a pump in the same, and prepare it for a 
public watering place, at or near the comer of the road, 
between the house of Andrew M. Blaisdell and Thomas 
Sheehan, or act in relation thereto. 



X 



Article 16. f At the request of R. S. Ripley and John C. Hobbs, to see if 
the town will vote o raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for the purpose of decorating the graves of our town 
soldiers in the several cemeteries, on the 30th of May next, 
or act in relation thereto. 

Article 17. At the request of A. H. Sheldon, Ziba Gay, S. P. Sampson, 
and others, to see if the town will vote to dig a well at the 
cemetery in North Chelmsford, put a pump in the same, and 
make an appropriation therefor, or act in relation thereto. 

Article 18. At the request of E. H Shaw. C. A. Holt, George C. Moore, 
and others, to see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of live hundred dollars, for the purpose of 
extending waier pipes and purchasing hose for extinguish- 
ing tires in North Chelmsford, or act in relation thereto. 

Article 19. At the request of Henry S. Perham, John C. Hobbs, and 
others, officers of the Chelmsford Veterans' Association, to 
see if the town will cause to be prepared and placed upon 
its records n more accurate and complete statement than 
now exists of the military service of the men who. as resi- 
dents of the town, enlisted in defence of ihe Union during 
the war of the Rebellion, or act in relation thereto 

Article 20. At the request of Warren Berry, B. J Spaulding, D. W. Bick- 
ford, and twenty-eight others, to see if the town will vote to 
purchase land to enlarge the cemetery at South Chelmsford, 
fence, grade and lot the same, and make an appropriation 
therefor, or act in relation thereto. 

Article 21. At the request of Warren Berry, B. J. Spaulding, D. W. Bick- 
ford, and others, to see if the town will vote to dig a well 
in or near the cemetery at South Chelmsford, put a pump in 

v the same, and rai>e and appropriate the sum of fifty dollars 

therefor, or act in relation thereto. 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to 
purchase a gravel bank of Ira Atwood and Orrin Pierce, 
near the residence of Owen Lowney, at East Chelmsford or 
act in relation thereto. 



34 



Article 23. To see if the town will vote to accept the widening of the 
townway known as Bridge street, as laid out by the Select- 
men, beginning at a guide-post at the junction of said way 
with the way leading from the centre of the town to the 
West village, near the residence of David Pertaam, and run- 
ning westerly about two hundred feet to a stone wall at the 
end of the fence near the barn of William A Hoyt, or act 
in relation thereto. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting up attested 
copies thereof at the post-offices in the Centre of the town, South 
Chelmsford, North Chelmsford, West Chelmsford, and at the school- 
house at East Chelmsford, ten days at least before the time appoint- 
ed for holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make return of this warrant, with your do- 
ings thereon, to the Town Clerk, at the time and place of holding 
the meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this tenth day of March, in the year of 
our Lord eighteen hundred and ninety-two. 

EBEN T. ADAMS, 
GEO. F. SNOW, 
MARTIN ROBBINS, 

Selectman of Chelmsford. 



I have served the foregoing warrant, by posting up true and at- 
tested copies of the same at the places above mentioned, more than 
ten days before the day of holding said meeting. 

Attest: JOHN T. McCOY, 

Constable of Chelmsford. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




OF THE 



Town of Chelmsford, Mass. 



FOR THE 



Year ending Feb. 29, 1892. 



LOWELL, MASS.: 

VOX POPULI PRESS: S. W. HUSE & CO. 

i 892. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



The first meeting of the School Committee for 
the year 1891 was held March 18, 1891, and the 
Committee organized by the choice of J. A. Bartlett 
as chairman, and Riley Davis as secretary. Mr. 
George F. Snow was again elected Superintendent 
of Schools and Book A^ent for the Board. Of t-he 
faithful manner in which he has fulfilled his duties, 
it is unnecessary to speak here, as it is as well 
known to all the citizens as it is to your Committee. 
The past year has been one of continued prosperity 
on the part of the schools. There have been fewer 
changes in the corps of teachers, which is in itself 
a decided improvement; no complaints have been 
made to the Board as to the schools, and very 
few to the individual members who have charge of 
the various schools. This leads your Committee to 
the conclusion that their efforts to bring the schools 
of the town up to a higher standard each year, is 
~ appreciated by the parents and pupils. While there 
remain many things to be done to bring the 
schools up to the standard of many schools in our 



State, still we feel that there has been a very rapid 
stride made in that direction. The length of the 
school year has been kept at thirty-six weeks, as in 
the past three years. Your Committee has used its 
best endeavors to keep all the schools up to grade, 
and to do all that they could, with the means at 
hand, to keep them in the line of improvement. 

In the Superintendent's Report you will find the 
condition of the schools, as they have come under 
his eye, more fully *set forth than it would be possi- 
ble to do in this report. We commend a careful 
and earnest perusal of it by each citizen of the 
town. In the performance of their duties your Com- 
mittee find many things that could be changed for 
the better, and, so far as they are able, make these 
changes. 

We would call the attention of the Town to the 
crowded condition of the schools at the North and 
Centre villages, especially in the primary departments. 
At the North village the primary department has 
over seventy pupils. No teacher, however good, can 
properly look after and teach, with any degree of 
success, so many small children. The classes are 
too large, and some must be neglected. The teacher 
who has charge of this school is one of our best, 
but under the limitations of frail humanity she can 
not do the work of two, and do it properly. The. 
number for the spring term will be even larger, 
and an assistant must be employed in this school 
next year. 



At the Centre Primary School, although not so 
large as the North one, every seat is taken, and 
we have no room to seat more. It is understood 
that about twelve new pupils expect to go into this 
school in the spring. To make room for them, a 
class had to be sent forward to the Intermediate 
room, and that forced a class from that room for- 
ward to the Grammar room, each before they were 
fitted to go. The school-house is full now, in every 
room; the High School has over forty pupils, and 
more are coming. If the increase of pupils con- 
tinues for the next year as it has for the last two, 
the town will have to provide more room. Any 
one can verify these statements, if he will take 
the trouble to visit the schools spoken of. We ask 
your consideration of these facts, as they will cer- 
tainly come before you for action in the near 
future. 

In some of the schools it has been the custom to 
raise a sum of money by subscription to defray the 
expense of teaching music in the schools. The 
effect on the schools has been good, and your Com- 
mittee would recommend a small appropriation for 
this purpose, that it may be tried more fully. 

Your Committee notices that during some terms 
!*^ certain schools not a name of any visitor to the 
school (except it be the Superintendent or Com- 
mittee) appears on the register as having visited 
the school, and that in some of the largest in town. 



This is not as it should be. Both teacher and pupils 
are encouraged in their work by the visits of those 
interested in them and their work. We earnestly 
urge all, parents especially, and as many others as 
may care to, to visit the schools. Your Committee 
invite intelligent criticism at all times on the state 
of the schools, and such criticism can only be made 
after seeing the work done in them. 

The matter of appropriations we leave with the 
Town, asking them to heed the suggestion made, 
and, trusting in their wisdom and liberality, we feel 
that the schools will not suffer. The Town must 
feel that the Committee is working for their interests, 
and not from a personal standpoint; and the Com- 
mittee feel that the Town is able and willing to 
give them the means to carry on their work, pro- 
vided it is properly expended, and the value received 
for it. 

J. A. BARTLETT, Chairman, 
RILEY DAVIS, Secretary, 
JOHN H. WHIDDEN, 
R. S. RIPLEY, 
GEORGE A. BYAM, 
FRANK C. BYAM, 
LUTHER C. UPHAM, 
HENRY R. HODSON, ^ 

ORRIN PIERCE, 

School Committee. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Chairman and Gentlemen of the School Committee : 

In accordance with your rules I herewith respectfully 
submit my fifth annual report on the character and prog- 
ress of the schools under your charge. The work of the 
year has been progressive and in a large degree satisfac- 
tory. The more pronounced blending of the practical with 
the theoretical has given gratifying results. 

In speaking of the growing improvement in the princi- 
ples and methods of instruction, and of the increasing in- 
terest of the teachers in whatever concerns the welfare 
and progress of the schools under their care, it is im- 
possible to avoid what may appear to be repitition of the 
reports of preceding years. All that was true in the past 
is true now, while the rate of improvement has not dim- 
inished. 

In performing my duties as Superintendent I have fol- 
lowed a plan, the outlines of which I had developed dur- 
ing several years of teaching and supervision. This plan 
is founded upon the purposes of Public Schools, which are 
first of all, to prepare children for usefulness as citizens. 

The Republic guarantees its security, permanence, and 
progress by means of these. The immediate, primary mo- 
tive of common-school education is to teach and train chil- 



8 



dren to work, to form habits of systematic work, to love 
work, and to put their brains into work. I would have 
every boy and girl who graduates from our public schools 
in a large measure prepared to master the details of what- 
ever trade, business, or profession he or she may enter 
upon ; and to this end, every step of school work, from 
beginning to the close, should be directed. 

PROVINCE OF TEACHING. 

The angler studies the habits of the fish that he would 
catch ; this fish has a delicate taste, and he drops before it 
the fly peculiar to the season and to that country ; that fish 
is voracious, and he trolls for it with a revolving spoon. 
The hunter starts his hounds after the fox, and then he 
cuts across the country to intercept the fox as it turns 
in the circuit of its course. 

Sanitarians and economists tell us how to produce for 
diet lean meat, fat meat, or meat that is fat or lean in 
successive layers. 

There are strains of cattle that excel for butter making, 
while other strains excel in producing beef. The Arabian 
horse is characterized by speed, endurance, and command 
of his power when under the excitement of the race. In 
all these cases man operates explicitly and immediately 
upon the endowments of activities ; he arouses and incites 
the activities of the fish, the fox, the cow, and the horse, 
when he busies himself with them; he bends his own 
treatment of them so that it shall conform entirely to 
the nature and character of their activities ; his own form 
of dealing with them is conditioned wholly upon the form 
in which their activities proceed when they manifest them- 
selves. 



9 



The above cases suggest the peculiar province of teach- 
ing. The teacher incites the activities of those who are 
learning; he can incite no activity in a pupil which is 
not an original and permanent endowment of the race ; he 
can not incite a pupil to fly in the air, or to breathe un- 
der water, because the race has no endowment in this line. 
The child has for the class room his several faculties; 
each faculty has a form of activity that is peculiar to 
that endowment. 

The province of teaching is that of inciting the faculties 
that the child possesses to act in their normal form. The 
teacher's function is to use himself as an agent, and sys- 
tems of subject-matter as a means, to incite and direct in 
form the activities of the child. 

FORM-STUDY AND DRAWING. 

Our common-school instruction must fit for practical life. 
This proposition is self-evident. It is very pleasant at 
times to moralize upon education, and to wish that our 
public instruction had more of the aesthetic or culture in- 
fluences pervading it ; but we can not escape the fact that 
the public schools are supported by public taxes, that these 
taxes are paid by the people at large, and that there is 
in the public mind a firm conviction that instruction in 
the schools should be estimated by its practical value. 

Not to put too fine a point upon it, public education 
must have its distinctively bread-and-butter side, and this 
is a common-sense way of looking at the matter. A few 
fords, therefore, in regard to the practical business value 
of form study and drawing. As we look over this State, 
we see a great growth of our urban population, and closely 
connected therewith the development of numberless indus- 



10 



tries. We have come, as a State, to a great period of 
industrial development, and it is evident that many of the 
children now in our public schools, and those that are to 
follow them, must inevitably find employment in these in- 
dustries, not only as wage-workers, but also as directors of 
them, or as handling their products. The universal busi- 
ness testimony is, that the practical requirements for em- 
ployment in the higher and better class of these indus- 
tries are the possession of quick and accurate powers of 
observation, with skill of hand, and an ability to read and 
draw readily working drawings, as well as to make picto- 
rial representations of objects. I do not hesitate to say 
that it is entirely practicable to introduce the study into 
our schools, and it need not crowd out any other study. 
Education, to be practical, must respect more than it 
has done hitherto the manner in which a child's mind de- 
velops. Experience has abundantly proved that the best 
way of teaching young children what are called the "three 
R's ", is not by overdosing them with these studies, or 
confining them to these studies alone, but by judiciously 
interspersing with instruction in these, exercises that will 
lead children to observe, to talk, to make, and to draw. 
Bearing this point in mind, a moment's thought will show 
how valuable an adjunct this training in form-study and 
drawing can be made in the teaching of the fundamental 
branches in the schools. It can be brought in as a happy 
relief between the other studies, and as instruction in the 
lower grades is largely oral, it serves to break up the 
monotony of the regular work. In an experience in 
school work covering many years, I have never seen so 
much interest or so much good work done, in so short a 
time, in any subject as has been done in form-study and 
drawing during the winter term. 



11 



RELATIONS OF TEACHERS AND PARENTS. 

The relations of teachers and parents are usually of a 
friendly and harmonious character, and as such prove a 
most valuable aid to each, in the settlement of difficulties 
that may arise between pupils and teachers. Exceptions, 
however, occur where the parent assumes a hostile attitude 
without taking the trouble to inform himself of the facts 
regarding questions at issue. He feels wronged and 
aggrieved by fancied insults from the teacher, as set forth 
by his child; never for a moment suspecting himself as 
the unwitting dupe of prevarication or falsehood, and at 
once vigorously proceeds to defame the teacher and con- 
demn the school. Upon provocation of this kind did the 
parent reserve judgment until, by an interview with the 
teacher, he became fully and correctly informed of the 
matter in dispute, he would, no doubt, pursue a more 
consistent course. Reliable information may always be ob- 
tained from the teachers, who, it is believed, have neither 
the desire nor opportunity to misrepresent any transaction 
in their school work; hence their statements ought to be 
received as conclusive evidence upon all questions of 
grievance which may arise. 

FREE TEXT -BOOKS. 

The purchase and distribution of text-books and supplies 
occupies no inconsiderable portion of my time. A regu- 
lar system of debit and credit between this office and 
the teacher of each school is continued, and a similar 
system is maintained between the teacher and individual 
pupils. The responsibility of the teacher is thus magnified, 
as well as the liability of the scholar. The free text-book 
law, so-called, has now been in force since 1884. That it 



12 



is a saving, pecuniarily, to our citizens, as a whole, there 
can be no doubt. 

The cost of books and supplies, and the disbursements 
to the several schools, are shown by the following table : 

Books and supplies on hand March i, 1891 $ l 53 J 6 

Expended for books 347 14 

Expended for supplies 301 60 

$801 90 

BOOKS AND SUPPLIES FURNISHED. 

High School No. 1 $ 85 20 

Grammar School No. 1 48 20 

Intermediate School No. 1 59 5° 

Primary School No. 1 29 80 

Mixed School No. 2 13 15 

Mixed School No. 3 63 05 

Mixed School No. 4 24 00 

Mixed School No. 5 21 80 

Mixed School No. 6 37 00 

High School No. 8 60 60 

Grammar School No. 8 40 25 

Intermediate School No. 8 56 40 

Primary School No. 8 58 15 

Grammar School No. 9 31 60 

Primary School No. 9 21 00 

Books and supplies on hand 152 20 



35801 90 
MIXED SCHOOLS. 

Changes of teachers have occurred in each of these 
schools during the year. On the whole, I think some of 
them have been benefited by the change, while few, per- 
haps, have really been injuriously affected by it. It is 
not desirable, nor expedient — and this will apply to the 
graded schools as well — that I should publicly speak, on 



13 



the one hand, of any marked deficiencies in the methods 
of teaching and their results, or on the other of satisfac- 
tory methods and results, that have been witnessed in 
the several schools. Such information is always ready and 
often given, whenever you desire it for your better 
knowledge of the condition of any school and the 
efficiency of any teacher. Most of the teachers in the 
ungraded schools were peculiarly fitted for their positions 
by reason of experience and training; and the work as a 
whole was excellent. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

This grade is numerically large, with the prospect that 
soon in the North and Centre villages there will be a 
demand for more schools. 

It is the observation of all successful educators that 
the primary training is of the first importance, and it is 
easier to find efficient teachers for the other grades than 
for this. 

Young children need the most careful and skillful 
training. " He who teaches early engraves on marble ; he 
who teaches late writes on the sand." The training of 
the physical, moral, and intellectual nature, which the 
child receives in the primary school, affects his whole fu- 
ture course. I congratulate the Board upon the general 
excellence and efficiency of our primary teachers. 

For the excellent discipline, secured not by scolding 
and blows, but by the respect and even love, of the 
children which kind and gentle treatment of them, united 
ffyith decision and authority judiciously blended, seldom fail 
to win — for the neat appearance of school rooms and 
scholars — the enthusiasm of the teacher in discharging 



14 



every duty, and the corresponding interest and proficiency 
of the children — for these and other gratifying characteris- 
tics, our Primary Schools are deserving of special com- 
mendation. 



INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS. 

The work prescribed for these schools has been carried 
out quite efficiently and with a good measure of success. 
The year's work began with less dependence upon the 
text-books in Geography and Grammar ; and this course 
was pursued through the year, with, in most cases, better 
results than by slavishly following the text-books. To do 
this successfully required more effort on the part of the 
teacher, more careful preparation for each exercise, and is 
a better test of skill in teaching, and those achieve the 
most satisfactory results, who enter into the work with 
the determination to make it a success. 

Formerly beginners in grammar had to be imprisoned 
for a longer or a shorter period, shivering in the cold 
vestibule of the science, fed on the husks which the 
astute grammarians had kindly prepared for them. Now 
they are let in at a side door and ushered at once into 
the inner temple, where they revel in the delights of 
their mother tongue. 

The young student of geography today, instead of 
paining your sensitive ears with a mechanical recital of 
that of which he can scarcely have a conception, comes 
forward, pointer in hand, and with the air of a veritable 
showman, locates and describes on a map of his own 
drawing the geographical wonders of the world to his 
admiring auditors. 



15 



GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 



I wish to express my appreciation of the faithful work 
of our Grammar School teachers. From the invaluable 
privilege of visiting other schools, teachers bring home 
the application of correct principles and turn them to 
c^ily increasing advantage. They not only bring back the 
principles but the enthusiasm of foreign work. That gen- 
eration of teachers has passed away which saw in methods 
other than their own only objects of contempt or com- 
placent criticism. The labor of the school-room has been 
largely increased since the teacher teaches, but the bur- 
den has been cordially accepted from an appreciation of 
its reasonableness. As the work of the year has been 
similar to that of several preceding years, both in its re- 
quirements and in the manner of meeting them, I will 
only say that in progress and final results it will com- 
pare favorably with that of the period embraced in my 
former Reports. 

HIGH SCHOOLS. 

• The character of J these schools has not only been sus- 
tained, but improved by more matured methods of instruc- 
tion more skilfully applied. The course of study now, I 
believe, meets the demands of a first-class High School, 
and with one other inprovement would warrant us in 
looking for excellent results. This want can be met in 
no other way than by the erection of a suitable building 
for this grade, and the conveyance thereto of all High 
School pupils in the town. Give this and we shall be 

^prepared to carry out a practical and thorough training ; 
such as will, on the one hand, prepare young men and 
young women with just the kind and amount of knowl- 



16 



edge that they will find useful on their entrance into life, 
while it implants in them a taste for intellectual pursuits, 
which will inspire them to carry on their own education 
after school life is over; and on the other, will furnish 
a firm and solid foundation to those who pass on to 
higher institutions of learning. Chelmsford owes it to her- 
self to cherish fondly the interests of these schools, in- 
asmuch as they have in the past, and will continue in 
the future, to furnish teachers for our own town as well 
as for other places. 

GENERAL REMARKS. 

The examinations of the schools the past year plainly 
show that progress has been made. The reviews have in- 
dicated that thoroughness has been the aim, and the re- 
sults have been generally satisfactory. In most of the 
schools the teachers seemed to take special pains to make 
the rooms as pleasant as possible, by ornamenting them 
with pictures, mottoes, flowers, and plants. All school- 
rooms ought to be attractive and beautiful. I wish parents 
would oftener visit the schools to become eye witnesses 
of the work being done. A quick and ready sympathy 
between parents and teachers, and a keen and personal 
interest of parents in school work are of vital moment to 
the success of education. Nothing so much quickens the 
teacher's courage and enthusiasm as the feeling that home 
influence is exerted in the same direct line as that of 
school ; and frequent visits of father and mother to the 
school-room delight the children and inspire them to a de- 
sire to excel in what pleases their parents. There should 
be an active alliance between the school and the fam- 
ily, for the former is the conserver and benefactor of the 
latter. By visiting the schools, parents can learn what is 
being done and what is necessary to be done to make 



17 



the most progress. This would serve to give, not only 
mental force to the young, but would have a tendency to 
improve our educational accommodations and render the 
public ready to give freely and generously for the support of 
common schools. These have entwined our country's his- 
tory with brightest laurels. "Our wealth lies in mines of 
intellect that remain undeveloped in the youths of our 
land, and not in gold, silver, and iron." To make this 
wealth available to its highest ends, we must labor inces- 
santly to place a good education within the reach of all. 
"The principle of our fathers was, that the wealth of the 
State should educate the children of the State." They 
used the term educate in no restricted sense. The name 
common or public schools should be most significant. These 
should be first-class schools, where the children of the rich 
and poor may obtain a thorough education. 

"We must build securely from foundation to topmost 
stone, to have our school edifice as a beacon to our chil- 
dren, to light up their morning pathway, to gild their 
noonday track, and render beautiful their evening circuit." 

The responsibility resting upon us as parents and guar- 
dians of the young is indeed great. What we do for them 
must be done quickly, for every rising sun is hastening 
their maturity. The time they spend in the school-room 
will be likely to fix their destinies for success or failure. 
This being true, we have no right to be indifferent to 
a cause of such vast moment. "If we would show our- 
selves Christians we must cherish our schools. If we would 
prove ourselves patriots, we must sustain and foster them. 
If they are not what we would have them in all respects 
L must not find fault with them and then remain inac- 
f but we should set ourselves to work to remove the 

. The prosperity of our schools depends upon indi- 



18 



vidual and united efforts. If we would supplant the fail- 
ures in them with successes, if we would have moral, men- 
tal, and physical culture characteristic of every school-room, 
and the distinguishing feature of every scholar in our 
schools, we must encourage and improve them." 

CONCLUSION. 

Although we have reason to rejoice at the relatively 
high position attained by our schools, we must not forget 
that there is still room for improvement. 

While individual notions and popular fallacies should be 
looked upon with distrust, we should never allow our pre- 
judices to prevent us from adopting any new idea that 
the experience of others has proved to be of value. I 
would urge upon the people of the town that they should 
seek to know thoroughly the teachers into whose charge 
are given such precious interests; that they should try 
to find out what our teachers are endeavoring to do ; 
what the difficulties are, and how much they do accom- 
plish toward the intellectual and moral growth of these 
young minds; and that we all join our efforts in hearty 
co-operation toward the end we all have in view, the 
making of our boys and girls into keen-witted, active, and 
good men and women. 

It gives me pleasure to renew my expressions of grati- 
tude to the Committee, the teachers, and the public, for 
the many evidences of their co-operation and support which 
I have received during another year's labors in the schools. 
Respectfully submitted, 

GEO. F. SNOW. 



Superintendent of Public Schools. 
Chelmsford, March 4, 1892. 



\ 

\ 



ROLL OF HONOR. 



Centre High School No. 1. 

Not Absent or Tardy for the Year — Ednah F. By am. 

Not Absent or Tardy for Two Terms— Harry A. Dutton, Alice M. 

Stearns, Ralph W. Emerson, Jessie M. Holt, Edwin L. 

Stearns. 
Not Absent or Tardy for One Term — Annie F. Chandler, Arthur 

E. Dutton. Helen G. Fulton, G. Thomas Parkhurst, John H. 

Pratt, Edward J. Robbins, Ferdinand M. Scoboria. 
Tardy but not Absent for Two Terms — John H. Pratt. 
Tardy but not Absent for One Term — George H. Blood, Arthur A. 

Harmon. 

Centre Grammar School No. 1. 

Not Absent or Tardy for the Year — Estelle G. Hutchinson. 

Not Absent or Tardy for Two Terms — Bernard H. Byam, Harold 

H. Davis, Hawthorne Howard, Leslie R. Davis, Ralph H. 

Stearns, Harry N. Ward. 
Not Absent but Tardy for Tioo Terms — Grace S. Parkhurst. 
Not absent or Tardy for One Term — Victor L. Parkhurst, Charles 

P. Holt, Harry G. Hooper, Eva Hutchins, Charles Kearns. 

Centre Intermediate School No. 1. 

Not Absent or Tardy for the Year — Marion Emerson. 

Not Absent or Tardy for Two Terms — Susie Carney, Olive Eaton, 

George Kearns, Ralph Adams. 
Not Absent or Tardy for One Term — Lawrence Marshall, Mary 

Mooney, Michael O'Day, George French, Arnold Perham. 



rtii 



Centre Primary No. 1. 

lot Absent for Two Terms — Arthur Hill (tardy once), Arthur 
Adams, Eva Perham, Edith Hagerman, Fred Holt, Harlie 
Knowlton. 



20 



Not Absent for One Term — Emma Glidden, Edna Coffin, Mary 
Kearns, Paul Davis, Ella Knowlton, Maud Knowlton, Maud 
Perham, Alice Brennan, Ethel Hagerman, Herman Hill, Levi 
Howard, Rachel Marshall, Walter Smith, Angie Rowell 
(tardy). 

Mixed School No. 2. 
Tardy but not Absent for One Term — Eva Decatur. 

Mixed South School No. 3. 

Not Absent or Tardy for Two Terms — Ida Palmer, Nettie A. 
Byam. 

Not Absent or Tardy for One Term — Lucy H. Byam, Hattie Emer- 
son, Annie M. Wood, Gertrude E. Wood, Grace Garland. 

Mixed School No. 4. 

Not Absent or Tardy for One Term — Frank A. Melvin, Walter H. 
Redman, Edward B. Redman, Stewart Redman, Percy B. 
Redman, Winton C. Gale. 

Mixed School No. 5. 

Not Absent or Tardy for Two Terms — Arnold A. Byam. 
Not Absent or Tardy for One Term — Carrie B. Newhall. 

Mixed School No. 6. 

Not Absent for the Year — Perle Dyar (tardy). 

Not Absent for One Term — Harry Dix (tardy), Marshall Dix (tardy), 
Mary Dix (tardy), Perle Dyar (tardy). 

Grammar North School No. 8. 

Not Absent for the Year — Viola Green (tardy). 

Not Absent for Two Terms— Edith Merrill (tardy), Walter Marinel, 

Arthur Wheeler. 
Not Absent or Tardy for One Term — Carrie Cook, Winnie Quirk. 

Intermediate North School No. 8. 

Not Absent or Tardy for the Year — Frank G. Hall. 
Not Absent or Tardy for Two Terms — Sadie Leahey, Frank Hall. 
Not Absent for One Term — Sadie Leahey, Frank Hall, L. Larkin \ 
(tardy), G. Merrill, G. Lumbert (tardy). > 



21 



Primary North School No. 8. 

Not Absent for the Year — Richard Davis (tardy), Ina G. Lumbert. 
Not Absent for Two Terms — Maud Wright (tardy), Blanche Wright 

(tardy), Hubert Bearce. 
Not Absent for One Term — Gladys Swain, George Jutras, Thomas 

Larkin, John Shields (tardy), Herbert Worden (tardy), Bertie 

Fisher, Eva Jutras, Mary Jutras, Loretta Ward, Esther 

Bearce. 

West Grammar School No. 9. 

Not Absent for One Term — Cora Daw (tardy), Florence Winship, 
Charles Dane. 

West Primary School No. 9. 

Not Absent for the Year — Arthur Kneeland (tardy), Charlie Abra- 

hamson (tardy). 
Not Absent for Two Terms — George Chapman, Nina E. Dane, 

Gertrude Abrahamson (tardy). 
Not Absent for One Term — Carl Swanson (tardy), Axel Swanson, 

Gust Swanson (tardy), Roy Mason (tardy), Willie Flynn, 

Jennie Varin, Emma Holt (tardy). 



/ 



\ 



•q^uoui .id saS^^l 



fipmj8 naaAA^ag; 



•saisaA" gt aaAQ 



•sa-eaA' g .xapufi 



•aoirBpua^u -Ay 



p.lstSaa aaqam& 



•s^T3a 



■sinuoK 



muoui ad saS-BAi 



H 

1 

s 


•jl pm? g uaaAviag 


•sa^aA* et aaAo 


•sa^aA" g aapufl 


•aau'BpuajvB "Ay 


•p 4 isi£aa aaqranx 


*s^«a 


•sq^uoK 



looqog jo -ok 



o o o o oo o 

oo o o oo o 



goo oo oo 

o^ o «o«o o«o 
eoaoeo coco coco 



oo 


si 

CO 


a 


^HO 


Oi 


l« 


<N rl 


>oeo 
eoo» 


£3 


1— ( 

6 


00 








- 




COM 






g 








- 






H 


eo 


eo 


00 


eoc* 


+ 

N 

o 

CO 


-<* 

co 


com 

CO <N 




CO 


lO ■* to 

0035 

eoojrt 


OS 

cotij 


r-t 00 

eo »o 

SSI 


8 

3 



coco eo eo eo co eo eo eoeoco eo eo eoeo 






eo -eoeo -co 



S£~5ii 



it 



= c^ w 
O O O 



-3 » 



$:§ 



a> a SJt 1 St! Strc i*/3 « r c t~ ~ c £ be a; 

■St 5 ESCasgS fc § pS cJ2 5 o«»c 5 o* a 

%^^^Z 08 = 3.3 35 §« ^co;- 5 e£ * BS SO 



III H CN 



• • u 

lis? 



-.2 



£55 



C O 
"OX? 



s si 

til 



I* 



« J l/ 






\ 



aoiTBpuawrc jo -1U80 .xaa; 




•S.I8 

qoBaj jo eaS^Ai 



•aoutjpua^'B -av 



p ( jsiS8.i joqranx 



•s^a 



•sqjuoK 



inuora ad soSbay 



f i pire 8 uaaAv^oa 



•SJ'Ba^ Ct .I9A0 



•s.reaA" g .igpun 



•aoutjpuo^B -Ay 






Soooooooooooooo 
OOOOOOQOOOOOOOO 

P -M r>t f>i s ci 3 x C Eft 55 *< <N 3 <M 



8l8g33±i5s: 



0OOiO5OiO;CiC5C53;O5O5O5C5O5O5 






S£SS§ 



h- t" tJ rt « N Q 



p.lsiSaa .igqranx SSgSSSSSSSSI 



•SA*13(I 



•siuuojvt 



•looiios JO OK 



O-l CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 



R W as "T m JS -> • 



o« :s 




KB, 






ir-n-Hi-iC'iec-^iocoooooxoooso 






wo^ssSSsSBoiSfiSpH 






B sSTS 
-. a © 

•In 






' 



.- 



I 



*0 fit 



\ 




1 



,